Thursday, April 14, 2022

 The Monday before Easter, the Bean Life Science Museum held a wonderful family night for people of all ages. The kids and kids at heart had the options to do a craft, listen to an educational presentation, take a group picture at the photo booth, make a pledge to be a better steward of the planet, and could even complete a bingo scavenger hunt to win prizes! 


The craft room stayed busy throughout the night. Crayons and markers were used to decorate, as well as colorful paper to make eggs and bunnies out of! Limitless varieties of egg and bunny could be made, since the bunnies size depended on the size and shape of your own hand’s cutout. This was a room that everyone could enjoy.



In the basement, the museum’s educators gave several presentations of one of our favorite biome programs, which are usually put on every night of the week at 7:30pm! Visitors could also learn more about animals by visiting our curiosity cart, where we had several specimens of ducks and eggs to show off.



Eggs were hidden among the animals of the museum, and could be found anywhere from the leopard’s mouth, to the baboon’s butt! Once a bingo, or even a blackout, had been found visitors could go to our prize booth and spin the wheel for the chance to take home a toy animal, reusable straw set, seashell, or one of our other options!



Thanks to our amazing team and even more amazing visitors, the Easter Family night event was a huge success! We look forward to similar events in the future!

-Sarah Palmer, Museum Educator






















Wednesday, March 30, 2022

Birding with Merrill Webb Nature Experienceship - March 26, 2022

As the sun was rising on a beautiful spring Saturday morning, a group of excited birders gathered in the BYU Life Sciences Museum parking lot. The group eagerly anticipated the five destinations between Provo and Mona picked by birding expert and our guide, Merrill Webb. Mr. Webb gave the group a breakdown of the day and expressed his high expectations to see many unique bird species. 

First stop: Salem Pond

When we arrived at the Salem Pond, everyone quietly exited the vans and pulled out their binoculars. It was a picturesque scene as the waterfowl swam and the birders fixed their binoculars on the beautiful birds. The birders identified several different waterfowl species. Mr. Webb brought everyone’s attention to a Belted Kingfisher, Virginia Rail, and Steller’s Jay. Everyone observed them in awe. As we drove away from our first spot, a few of the birders saw some species – a Kestrel and others – that intrigued the group enough to pull over and once again commence birdwatching. 


Second stop: Payson City Cemetery

Mr. Webb took the group to the Payson City Cemetery in search of one bird – the Great Horned Owl. Immediately upon arrival, Mr. Webb spotted a couple that was there for the same reason. They were kind enough to show us where they had spotted the owl. Our group of birders followed and admired the beautiful owl perched in a tree overlooking a field of gravestones. 




Third stop: Cedar Hollow Reservoir

The next stop took us on dirt roads and right by a beautiful orchard. Cedar Hollow Reservoir was a prime location for observing waterfowl. The group spotted Green-winged Teal, Red-winged Blackbird and others.


Fourth stop: Goshen Playa

The fourth stop took us to a reservoir a mile or so east of Goshen. With Mt. Nebo in the backdrop, the group observed more species of waterfowl. 





Fifth stop: Mona Reservoir

Mr. Webb took the group to Mona Reservoir to observe more waterfowl. The drive through Goshen Canyon had the passengers amazed by the beautiful views. Upon arrival at the reservoir, one of the birders heard a Meadowlark and had all of the birders searching for the beautiful birds. After observing it for a while, everyone’s attention returned to the beautiful waterfowl. 



Sixth stop: Rowley's Red Barn in Santaquin for some ice cream. :)

Alex, museum educator

Species spotted:

Canada Goose

Gadwall

American Wigeon

Mallard

Cinnamon Teal

Northern Shoveler

Green-winged Teal

Canvasback

Redhead

Lesser Scaup

Bufflehead

Common Goldeneye

Ruddy Duck

Pied-billed Grebe

Eared Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Northern Harrier

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Cooper’s Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

American Kestrel

Virginia Rail

American Coot

Sandhill Crane

Killdeer

Ring-billed Gull

California Gull

Eurasian Collared-Dove

Great horned Owl

Belted Kingfisher

Northern Flicker

Say’s Phoebe

Steller’s Jay

Black-billed Magpie

American Crow

Common Raven

American Robin

European Starling

Song Sparrow

Red-winged Blackbird

Western Meadowlark

House Finch


BYU Night at the Museums 2022

It was a night to remember as we had record amounts of people participate in the BYU Night at the Museums event this past Friday (March 25, 2022)! Thousands of people came pouring through the door, searching for the answer to one of the five clues they had to solve to win a free water bottle. To find what they were looking for at the Bean Life Science Museum, they had to make their way to the basement where one of our educators, Holly, was waiting by the bat display with stickers for the visitors who had solved the riddle.

But that’s not all the fun that was waiting for them! There were education stations where patrons could learn more about animal furs and skins or native Utah plants; 

a craft room where they could make their own butterfly or dragonfly out of pipe cleaners, paper and beads; and donuts for visitors - at least until all 1,000 of them had been handed out! 


Visitors who came later also got the chance to guess the name of a mystery animal that stumped everyone but our museum director! And even he had to think for a while before he could think of ‘ringtail cat’.


All in all, it was a great night. If you couldn’t make it, don’t feel too bad - there’s always next year! 

Check out the Daily Universe article about the event.

Arissa, museum educator

Wednesday, March 23, 2022

Winter 2022 Date Night - Tomb Raiders

On Saturday, March 5th the BYU life science museum ran a date night for thirty couples. Dinner was catered by Brick Oven and included pizza, pasta, and salad. Afterwards, we ran a series of games and riddles with a tomb raider theme. The games included a nerf gun shooting range, two scavenger hunts, a laser maze, a trust exercise where one partner guided the other blindfolded through a maze, and a series of five riddles. Throughout the games, the players had to avoid being captured by a group called the shadow guard. All in all, it was an enjoyable night at the museum. 

Daniel, educator








Monday, March 14, 2022

Winter 2022 Trivia Nights

On January 29 and February 26, 2022, we had our first Bean Museum Trivia Night! For January we had trivia about Mandela Effects, Geography, and Mythological creatures. As participants came out of the elevator they were met with a difficult choice, which animal they wanted to have represent their team. With options including a hawksbill sea turtle, coral, and an eared grebe it was not an easy choice. As the questions began, participants were under the threat of Karl G. Maeser’s ghost as they scored themselves through the rounds. After totaling their points the winners were announced, earning the right to choose their prize from some of the best options left over from the store. Even though only three teams got to bring a prize home, everyone got a prize they could eat. The perfect consolation to those who lost, and an added bonus to those who won, donuts were available to all of the guests. 

The February Trivia Night was just as successful. We focused on life science questions this time with rounds requiring you to identify animal sounds and close up animal pictures, determine if the image was a plant or if it was a fungus, invertebrate trivia, how to interact with animals and finally an animal fact kahoot speed round. This time there was a three way tie, meaning that those three groups in first place were able to choose their prize from some animal figurines or a bean fidget toy. The winners of the kahoot round were also able to choose a prize. We had table mascots again, but this time there was a small write up to teach the groups about the animal they chose to represent them. Of course we had to follow it up with donuts again, as they were a big hit at the first trivia night. Kahoot Winners:





February Trivia Night:





Monday, February 14, 2022

Darwin Day 2022

On February 12th, the Bean Museum was excited to celebrate Charles Darwin’s 213th birthday. 12 days leading up to the party, the museum posted on their various social media accounts 12 days of Darwin posts. BYU professors talked about the life of Charles Darwin, the campus’ honors program hosted a behind the scenes field trip of the museum, and a plush Darwin (nicknamed “Chucky-D”)  was even hidden in various museum exhibits for museum patrons to find and win a prize!

On the day of Charles Darwin’s actual birthday, the museum had several activities and games to commemorate his big 2-1-3. In the front classroom of the museum, guests could listen to a story of Charles Darwin’s life and color a picture of him. The downstairs auditorium of the museum played a short video biography. The East classroom had activities focusing on concepts learned by Darwin. This included a game to determine which “bird beak” was more effective at eating “food” and mixed up phylogenetic trees for patrons to put together themselves. 



Of course, what is a birthday party without birthday cake? Museum party-goers were given a passport with all of the activities listed, and after each activity they were given a stamp on their passport. After finishing at least 3 activities, they could take their stamped passports to a special exhibit about Darwin’s life and get a piece of cake!



Parties are fun, but at the end of the day the important thing celebrated was Charles Darwin and his contributions to science. Biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky once famously said, "Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution." Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution has helped us to make sense of and appreciate the world around us, increasing our understanding of the importance of taking care of the planet and all the living things here.


Happy Birthday Charles Darwin!



Robyn Slater, museum educator